Wednesday, December 28, 2011

William Shatner & Yvette Mimieux in Disaster on the Coastliner (1979)

The glut of disaster movies in the 70's included a second tier of television films. In this one, a deranged computer programmer (Paul L. Smith) distraught at the loss of his wife and child, reprograms a rail system's computer to put two trains on a collision course, endangering the lives of the passengers. Will they be able to circumvent disaster? Along for the ride is charming grifter, Stuart Peters (Shatner) and an unhappy Paula Harvey (Mimieux). At home base, trying to solve the problem are Al Mitchell (Lloyd Bridges), Estes Hill (Raymond Burr) and Roy Snyder (E. G. Marshall). Though a fromage fest, this film has a lot of entertainment to offer. If you're a fan of bloated, second tier star spectacles, give it a try.

Though not available on DVD, you can find this film in full on YouTube. It's above in full, uploaded by TheGialloGrindhouse.

Obscurity factor: 8 (not on DVD, available on YouTube, largely forgotten except for a small cadre of fans)

10 comments:

  1. With William Shatner on board, there should be at least as much jambon as fromage. I'll have to give this one a try: as I wrote here a few weeks ago I can't stand attics and cellars, but transportation-wise, I'll take anything.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Yes, thick slices of jambon accompany that fromage... And you're right, conveyances do seem to frequently make for good drama.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Pretty good in the end. Not a Martha Raye meets Gary Collins schlockfest. Shatner and Mimieux play lighter than the rest, as if they - and they alone - were in a Silver Streak kind of script. Nice period piece.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Yes, the two do have that quirky romantic comedy quality...

    ReplyDelete
  5. "Bloated, second-tier star spectacles"????? YAY!!!!!!!!!! I somehow missed it - can't wait to watch....

    ReplyDelete
  6. It's wacky! There are a lot of made-for-tv disaster films out there that have been lost to obscurity.

    ReplyDelete
  7. ...and none with such a cast of eminent has-beens as "SST: Death Flight." Robert Reed, Tina Louise, Barbara Anderson, Lorne Greene, Susan Strasberg and many more. It's on Youtube, but with MST3K graffiti and in horrendous quality.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I'll have to check that one out!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Why is it that Shatner was never so smooth as when he was in Star Trek? Every role after that was stilted and awkward?

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hmm, good question. I don't think it's necessarily across the board, though. I think it has to do with material and direction... Left to his own devices his work suffers, but with good support he can be good.

    ReplyDelete